Know Your 4 Ps to Integrate Traditional and Social Media Marketing

Know Your 4 Ps to Integrate Traditional and Social Media Marketing

This guest post is by Kimberly E. Stone, the founder of POSHGLAM.com, and an entrepreneur with a knack for recognizing creative talent and pinpointing successful fashion lines. She’s been featured as one of Black Enterprise’s Top 10 Women of Power under 40 and continues to set the standard for social media in the Fashion 3.0 realm.

Know Your 4 Ps to Integrate Traditional and Social Media MarketingTraditional marketers understand marketing to be comprised of four facets, known as the Four Ps: price, product, placement and promotion. There are different theories about where social media fits into this picture. Some say it lies in the promotional sector with public relations and advertising; others would argue that because you relinquish a portion of the conversation to the consumer, it’s in a fifth category all its own: people.

With the prevalence of social media outlets and places to rant, rave and review, word-of-mouth marketing has become a streamlined force of communications and reliability for consumers — but not necessarily for brands.

A healthy marketing mix revolves around the product and its price, as well as how its value is conveyed to the customer for longevity, market immersion and trust.  Though humanizing the brand is important, and thinking like the customer is an integral part of gaining insight into what the next step for the brand should be, social media should be reserved for the sake of gaining intelligence, interacting with customers and managing crises. The online presence should act as an extension to existing marketing messages, not the end-all be-all of modern marketing.

My advice is to consider every other aspect of the marketing mix first and to plan the social media campaign as a complement to existing communications. It’s important to catalyze marketing messages with major channels of promotion, and only use social media to interlace those messages and help to further communicate them to the consumer. I suggest using both push (traditional) and pull (social media + viral grassroots) marketing strategies to present your consumers with a 360-degree, well-rounded understanding of your company.

How to Integrate Traditional and Social Media Marketing

1. Use a visual ad to build trust and branding.

Advertising’s high barrier to entry reinforces exclusivity and brand prestige, makes competition a lot easier, and makes acquiring market share even more simple. Some people have wandered away from appreciating traditional advertising, and it’s gotten a bad reputation for its high cost and lack of quantifiable results. And yet most people can reflect back on ads that have totally changed their mood, and if you can change customers’ moods through imagery, you can also inadvertently change their decisions, too. Remember, both PR and advertising are designed to evoke emotion, one through words or text and the other through imagery. A picture says a thousand words — and without a visual ad of some kind, that would be a lot of influential “words” to lose!

2. Use social media to communicate directly with customers.

Fit social media messages into the already-existing PR plan, but add a consumer-centric twist to your messaging. For example, instead of saying, “Our cupcakes are on sale for 20 weeks with a percentage of the sale going to Breast Cancer Awareness” — which is how you might alert a journalist — speak directly to the consumer with something more friendly: “Buy cupcakes for the kids. We are giving a percentage of the sale back to a charitable cause.” It’s important to tailor each message effectively.

3. Control the conversation as much as possible.

Every marketing campaign will naturally have some word of mouth, so companies should give customers the right conversation topics need to create healthy discussions about the brand. It’s important to keep in mind that customers will naturally always have vested interest in themselvesand not necessarily the brand. There’s no reason to leave the marketing up to them — it’s not what they specialize in, but it’s your core competency. Mediate conversations by responding to criticism professionally and promoting your biggest brand ambassadors. Take back the control, take back your marketing messages, and take back your brand.

The Young Entrepreneur Council (YEC) is an invite-only organization comprised of the world’s most promising young entrepreneurs. In partnership with Citi, the YEC recently launched #StartupLab, a free virtual mentorship program that helps millions of entrepreneurs start and grow businesses via live video chats, an expert content library and email lessons.

Reputation Capital Media Services is a Baton Rouge marketing agency that helps B2B companies and their marketing agencies produce high-quality digital content, including blog posts, e-mail newsletters, white papers and multimedia. Our editors and writers are experts in their fields, which include HR technology, employee benefits, and financial services and accounting. Contact us for a free 30-minute consultation to find out how great content can help you attract and retain your customers.

Mary Ellen Slayter is managing director of Reputation Capital Media Services. Before creating her own content marketing firm, she served as director of content development and a senior general business and finance editor at SmartBrief, a leading publisher of e-mail newsletters. Before joining SmartBrief, she spent 8 years at The Washington Post, where she authored the Career Track column and worked as an editor in the business news department. You can find Mary Ellen on Twitter @MESlayter.

0 Comments

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>